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Zero Breast Cancer

  • Teri Hollowell: A Zest for Life, a Zeal for Giving

    teri hollowell

    In 2001, Teri Hollowell, friend and supporter of ZBC, combined her passion for world travel and corporate event planning expertise, to create One World Partners, a company that stages international corporate events. "The corporations were often local, but wanted to create international events all over the world," explains Teri.

  • Thank You to Our ZBC Community!

    2019 dipsea pre hike for web

    The Zero Breast Cancer Team, and Board of Directors would like to thank all of you who generously gave of your time, resources and energy to make our Dipsea Hike a tremendous success!

    Well over 200 participants showed up on that bright, chilly Saturday morning. Our hikers were greeted with bagels, yogurt, fruit and local Equator Coffee. Once nourished, they had the energy necessary to complete the both beautiful and challenging hike up the steps and over the hill, before returning to have lunch with us back in Old Mill Park where everything started.

  • The #metoo World of Breast Cancer Treatment

    Thanks to Janelle Burchfield for giving us permission to share her story.

    janelle web

     "You're such a delicate creature. You need to think about all the delicacies of being a woman."
    - Random Doctor, after tossing a breast implant at me

    So, this was my most recent Me Too moment - navigating the male-centric world of cancer treatment.

    I'd kept my diagnosis pretty private for the first couple of months while I processed, letting only those closest to me know. Some women are so brave to share their story, I haven't been one of them. I knew I didn't want this disease to own or define me, and so I’ve taken my time in deciding how to speak about it -and Breast Cancer Awareness Month and all the countless other women sharing their Me Too stories gave me some courage.

  • The Tipping Point

    This inspiring post is from our Executive Director's cousin, Jo Gordon, with our thanks.

    Jo Gordon Reflections

    Several months after my dad died – 13 whiplash years ago – I was driving home from the gym one evening when a Josh Groban song began playing on the radio, Where You Are. Sitting at a red light, the mournful music washed over me. One verse gripped my heart, and squeezed and squeezed: Fly me up to where you are, beyond the distant star I wish upon tonight, to see you smile, if only for awhile to know you’re there, a breath away’s not far to where you are.

    I started to cry in a way I hadn’t before – not on hearing the news of dad’s sudden death, not standing at his gravesite on a chilly Johannesburg morning as kaddish was recited, not at the prayer service that evening, not as I waded through his closet, setting aside small treasures and throwing out boxes of boxes and bags of bags; not even that impressive collection of emptiness that he had stored so fastidiously for so long had been my undoing. But this one line in this one song wrung me out.

  • Tips on How to Reduce Chemical Exposure in Plastic (EWG)

    plastics blog

    Our homes are filled with plastics, and most of us don't really know what they're made of -- or whether they're safe. The Environmental Working Group (EWG) has put together these tips to help you choose better plastics and plastic alternatives for your family:

    • Why you should pick plastics carefully.
    • How to choose and use safer plastics.
    • Finding safer, non-plastic alternatives.
  • Waiting: The Hardest Part

    Jo Gordon Reflections

    Waiting to see if your new pain, out of nowhere, will resolve itself. Waiting for the surgeon’s office to return your distress call. Waiting to hear when you can be squeezed into the jammed CT scan schedule. Waiting to eat because if they can fit you in today, you need to be fasting. Waiting in a room filled with other waiters, all stoically counting minutes until it’s their turn to be stuck, probed, imaged. The longest wait – waiting for results. Waiting for the medical team to decide what happens next. Listening to an internal clock, ticking in a terrible silence. Waiting.

  • Website Recommendation: BCERP.org

    BCERP Image composite correct size

    The Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program (BCERP) website aims to make the latest scientific findings on the relationship between environmental exposures and breast cancer both accessible and actionable. Consisting of a transdisciplinary consortium of scientists, the BCERP is funded by the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) National Institute of Environmental Sciences (NIEHS) and National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). With community partners, the BCERP researchers look at how environmental exposures during key life stages may increase risk of breast cancer. (Full disclosure: ZBC was a community partner in the past.)

  • Website Recommendation: BreastCancer.org

    breastcancer.org logo blog two

    When dealing with breast cancer, and looking to prevent breast cancer, the vast amount of information and the decisions that need to be made can be overwhelming. In 1999, Dr. Marisa Weiss, a renowned breast oncologist, founded breastcancer.org to address these needs. As a non-profit organization, breastcancer.org is dedicated to providing the most reliable, complete, and up-to-date information about breast cancer. It is an excellent resource.  Their mission is to help women and their loved ones make sense of the complex medical and personal information about breast health and breast cancer so that they can make the best decisions for their lives. The people behind breastcancer.org bring with them a diverse set of skills and experience, from medical experts, writers, editors, and business development experts, to designers and web producers. A Professional Advisory Board (PAB) reviews all the medical information on the website. The PAB includes over 70 practicing medical professionals from around the world who are leaders in their fields. Breastcancer.org also provides a Spanish translation of its pages on the website.

  • Website Recommendation: EWG.org

    ewg logo blog 

    The Environmental Working Group (EWG) is a non-profit organization whose mission is “to empower people to live healthier lives in a healthier environment. With breakthrough research and education, we drive consumer choice and civic action.” By providing integrated and detailed information on toxins in a variety of products, EWG encourages readers to advocate for themselves and their health by making educated purchasing decisions. Their staff covers a wide variety of disciplines, including a team of scientists, policy experts, lawyers, communication experts and programmers all focused on reducing our environmental exposures. In the past, they have found that their education efforts have enabled the public to put pressure on companies to remove potentially hazardous chemical ingredients as well as improving their overall practices. Overall, they diligently work to inform the public, provide specific tips to reduce exposure, and influence policy to create a healthier world for us all.

  • Website Recommendation: FacingOurRisk.org

    FORCE logo cropped

    If you are a survivor, previvor or caregiver affected by a hereditary cancer, have ever wondered whether you should pursue genetic testing, or have tested positive for a mutation and wondering what the next steps are, Facing Our Risk of Cancer Empowered (FORCE) has a website chock-full of information and resources. FORCE is a non-profit organization committed to promoting awareness, sharing current information, providing support, advocating for and supporting research, and building a community of research and medical experts to guide those who are dealing with hereditary breast, ovarian and related cancers. Whether you are new to the topic or well-informed, this website can provide useful information and support to guide your journey.

  • Why We Focus on Girls’ Health Before and During Puberty

    ZBC New Puberty Campaign Graphic for web

    The number of girls starting puberty before age 8 is more than double what it was just a generation ago! And this is a problem: scientific research has shown that earlier development can lead to health issues, both in the short and long term.

    Puberty is controlled by sex hormones, which are influenced by behaviors and some chemicals in our environment. Girls today have different lifestyles than previous generations. For example, they have fewer opportunities to be active and new distractions that can make it harder to get enough sleep. Kids are also exposed to more and different chemicals that affect hormones. Scientists think that these changes have led to puberty starting earlier than ever before.

  • ZBC - One of Eight Breast Cancer Organizations Receiving Grants

    zbc avon walk11th Annual San Francisco Avon Walk Raises More Than $4.2 Million

  • ZBC Featured on 360BayArea Podcast - Beyond the Pink

    catherine 360bayarea

    Zero Breast Cancer is excited to share that our Program Director, Catherine Thomsen, is a featured guest on the November 360BayArea podcast. Titled Beyond the Pink, the episode explores the breast cancer topic from unique angles that go beyond the pink ribbon in order to understand genuine and diverse personal experiences of women who are diagnosed or had loved ones who have had breast cancer.

  • ZBC Honors Fern Orenstein

    HTH Fern et al hats

    From left to right: Britt Thal, Janice Barlow, Roni Peskin-Mentzer, Fern Orenstein, Francine Halberg, Rochelle Ereman

    Fern Orenstein was a founding member of Marin Breast Cancer Watch (which became Zero Breast Cancer in 2006). She retired from the main board at the end of 2015 as term limits finally caught up with her after 20 years! We are grateful that Fern remains a very active and engaged member of the ZBC Scientific Advisory Group. You can read more about this group here.

    Fern has embodied the mission and passion of Zero Breast Cancer with every ounce of her soul and every inch of her petite but mighty body. She served in every conceivable capacity and in every volunteer role during her tenure as a Director of the Board, including serving several years as Treasurer and President.

  • ZBC Internship Reflections by Leslie Civil

    Leslie at Marin Teen Girl conference for web

    As a Dominican University student pursuing a degree in Global Public Health (GPH), I wanted to engage in work outside my school environment. I am not from Marin County. I was born and raised in the San Mateo County, specifically in Redwood City. In my second year as an undergraduate, I was presented the opportunity to intern with Zero Breast Cancer. They were seeking a bilingual intern, and with only one day to spare I decided to apply and hoped for the best.

  • ZBC Reaches Washington, DC!

    2019 oct event pic with caption for web

    This Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Zero Breast Cancer materials have made their way to Washington, DC via a request from Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. – Xi Omega Chapter.

    ZBC educational fliers were shared with over 100 attendees at their Pink Table Talk: Breast Cancer Risks and Realities panel with speakers Dr. Regina M. Hampton and Dr. Carolyn B. Hendricks. The event took place on October 7th and was livestreamed on Facebook. Check out the recording of this very informative talk here.

  • ZBC Receives Generous Bequest

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    Sixteen years ago, Zero Breast Cancer’s Dipsea Hike was founded in memory of Andrea “Annie” Fox. Annie worked for the county, was an active athlete—a member of the Tamalpa Runners—and she loved Mt. Tamalpais. She was a founding board member of Marin Breast Cancer Watch, which is now Zero Breast Cancer. Annie was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 31 and died of her disease at age 35 in 2002 just before the first hike. Amongst others, Annie was survived by her mother Marjorie Bonner and her significant other at the time, Chris Stewart—a tireless organizer and volunteer who makes our annual hike possible.

    Marjorie was a donor to Marin Breast Cancer Watch since 2001, she founded the Andrea Fox Fund managed by the Marin County Board of Supervisors and continued to support Zero Breast Cancer for over 15 years.

  • ZBC Teen Volunteer Janessa's Stress Management Tips

    Janessa Blog

    Reducing stress is a key component in helping manage daily tasks. It doesn’t matter if you are in high school, college, or an adult, it can always be a battle to deal with stress. Specifically, the stress that comes with a breast cancer diagnosis can be the biggest battle of them all.

    One of the best things to do is to take your mind off of whatever is bothering you. For example, when my mom was diagnosed with breast cancer five years ago, she would attend weekly yoga classes and would go to any seminars offered at the hospital in order to gather information and meet others going through the same battle as her. She felt that attending weekly events really helped her through her treatment and post-treatment stages.

  • ZBC Teen Volunteer Keisha's Exercise Tips

    keisha blog

    There are many different ways to reduce the risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer, one of which is living a healthy lifestyle. One factor of a healthy lifestyle includes having daily exercise. Anyone can reduce their risk at any age, but it is especially encouraged to have an early start to prevent breast cancer.

  • ZBC Volunteer Spotlight: Cristine Albert

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    Cristine was introduced to ZBC in 2016 by Molly Schmidt, Community Engagement Coordinator, at the Center for Volunteer and Non Profit Leadership (CVNL). Cristine has an impressive track record in non-profit volunteering. She has served on boards, raised funds, engaged communities and led outreach efforts. She is no stranger to business either and brings her strategic consulting skills to for profit and non-profit clients alike. Cristine is currently enjoying a new career experience working with grade schools students in their classrooms while still keeping up her volunteer activities.