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Volunteer

  • Maritza and Ian recording for web
    Sound specialist Ian Walker of Hurricane Images
    and volunteer Maritza Cárdenas 
    record the narration for our
    Girls' New Puberty tips videos in Spanish.

    Zero Breast Cancer succeeds in very large part due to a dedicated cadre of volunteers, some of whom offer specialized and/or skilled pro-bono services. This month we thank and recognize 6 people who supported ZBC work in 2018 by translating, narrating, and/or reviewing new elements of our Girls’ New Puberty campaign: Chely Córdova, Frances Chiu, Hannah Barlow, Larry Chu, Maritza Cárdenas, and Perry Borders. 

  •  Karen and Maddie dipsea

    Mother/daughter team Karen and Maddie Loebbaka have been volunteering for Zero Breast Cancer’s Annual Dipsea Hike for 5 years—starting when Maddie was 11! Karen heard about the hike 6 years ago from a friend who is a breast cancer survivor and participated as a hiker the first year she was involved. Then, she and Maddie got interested in volunteering through the National Charity League, a nonprofit that promotes the benefits of mothers and daughters doing volunteer service together. If you’ve recently participated in the hike, you likely met them at the registration table, which they are well-experienced at running.

  • Janessa Blog

    Reducing stress is a key component in helping manage daily tasks. It doesn’t matter if you are in high school, college, or an adult, it can always be a battle to deal with stress. Specifically, the stress that comes with a breast cancer diagnosis can be the biggest battle of them all.

    One of the best things to do is to take your mind off of whatever is bothering you. For example, when my mom was diagnosed with breast cancer five years ago, she would attend weekly yoga classes and would go to any seminars offered at the hospital in order to gather information and meet others going through the same battle as her. She felt that attending weekly events really helped her through her treatment and post-treatment stages.

  • keisha blog

    There are many different ways to reduce the risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer, one of which is living a healthy lifestyle. One factor of a healthy lifestyle includes having daily exercise. Anyone can reduce their risk at any age, but it is especially encouraged to have an early start to prevent breast cancer.

  • christine albert two

    Cristine was introduced to ZBC in 2016 by Molly Schmidt, Community Engagement Coordinator, at the Center for Volunteer and Non Profit Leadership (CVNL). Cristine has an impressive track record in non-profit volunteering. She has served on boards, raised funds, engaged communities and led outreach efforts. She is no stranger to business either and brings her strategic consulting skills to for profit and non-profit clients alike. Cristine is currently enjoying a new career experience working with grade schools students in their classrooms while still keeping up her volunteer activities.

  • peter

    As well as volunteering, Peter is an engaging writer and blogger and his writing is at its finest and most impassioned when it gets most personal. It doesn't get more painful than the story of how his mother died of breast cancer when he was 10 years old and how he came to understand her death. With his permission, we have his piece titled "Mom's Gone" here:

  • ruth baillie

    An avid advocate and a talented writer, Ruth Baillie has dedicated her time to helping survivors of breast and other cancers navigate the emotions, challenges, and treatment decisions associated with overcoming the often overwhelming disease. In September 2016 Ruth reached out to ZBC to volunteer as a blogger.