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Support

  • 2015 Honor Thy Healer Community Supporters

    california sealZero Breast Cancer would like to thank the following public officials for their support of our 16th Annual Honor Thy Healer program:

  • App Recommendation: Detox Me

     Detox Me Image for web

    Like many health conditions, the risk of breast cancer can be impacted by exposure to harmful chemicals. As scientists have learned more about these problems, new resources have been developed. Detox Me is a free smartphone app that provides “…a personalized guide to reduce your exposure to toxic chemicals.” It has simple, research-based tips on how to avoid chemicals that affect our hormones and choose safer products. For those of us seeking to reduce harmful chemicals from our daily lives, it will track our progress and offer rewards!

  • Benefits and Support You Can Get from Joining Breast Cancer Support Groups by Ruth Riley

    Woman standing in front of a support group

    When my friend Mara felt a lump in her right breast in April 2019, her first reaction was panic. She got on the phone with me right away and asked me to come with her to the doctor.

    After a few days of anxious waiting, we received confirmation that it was breast cancer. As I sat beside Mara outside the doctor’s office, I could see her whole spirit deflating.

    I wasn’t sure how to help her, so I suggested we look for breast cancer support groups that she can join. Maybe if she connects with other people going through the same thing, she would feel less helpless and overwhelmed.

  • Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Education: A Special Partnership with the Safeway Foundation and Safeway Customers!

    Safeway GNP Funding Blog Image for web

    Every spring the Safeway Foundation focuses on Cancer as one of a dozen causes it cares about. Safeway customers make generous donations at the point of sale in their local Safeway stores in Northern California. For the past 12 years the NorCal Safeway Foundation has considered requests for funding to support the vision of Zero Breast Cancer and generously contributed a total of over $146,000 to date.

  • Christine Jon'el On Ableism and Racism in Breast Cancer

    Christine Jonel interview

    Christine Jon’el is a young, Black woman living with an amputation who has survived cancer two times. When we first spoke with her a few months ago, her passion for calling out ableism and racism in breast cancer was clear. We are grateful that she agreed to be interviewed so we can share her insights with you!

  • Cuídese durante Covid Parte 1: Comer bien y mantenerse activo

    Black woman eating salad

    Para la mayoría de nosotras, el cáncer cambió nuestras vidas. La pandemia de Covid-19 está cambiando nuestras vidas de nuevo. También muchos hemos pasados por una época de humo de incendios forestales y ahora los días son más cortos a medida que empieza la temporada de invierno. Las sobrevivientes del cáncer de seno en nuestra Junta Asesora Comunitaria del Estudio Pathways decidieron que el riesgo de Covid 19 y el autocuidado es un tema importante y oportuno que debemos abordar.

  • Cuídese durante Covid Parte 2: Conectando con los demás y con nosotras mismas

    Self care blog part 2

    Esta es la segunda de dos partes sobre lo que podemos hacer por nuestra salud y bienestar durante la pandemia de Covid, de las sobrevivientes de cáncer de mama en la Junta Asesora Comunitaria del Estudio Pathways. Aquí ellas comparten cómo se las arreglan: conectarse con la gente; tomando un descanso; respirar profundamente, meditar u orar; pidiendo apoyo; dormir; gratitud; y centrarse en seguir adelante. Las investigaciones han demostrado que todos estos pueden ayudar a nuestra salud física y mental. (Lea la primera parte para obtener ideas sobre cómo mover nuestros cuerpos y comer bien).

  • During Difficult Times, Your Sense of Humor Can Be Your Best Ally by Rosie Mankes

     

    women laughing

    A two-time cancer survivor reflects on the adage that laughter is the best medicine.

    I like to think of myself as a funny person. I always try to find a way to laugh about something and must admit that I am also a bit of a practical joker at times (as long as no one gets hurt). I even try to keep my sense of humor during difficult times, because it is an excellent way to break the ice in an uncomfortable situation. It helps me make light of my challenging circumstances, and it has helped me heal through considerable obstacles in life.

  • Genetic Counseling for Breast Cancer by Emily Goldberg

    Emily Goldberg from J Screen

    As a genetic counselor for the last 10 years, I've counseled patients about their cancer risks and guided them through the genetic testing process. I help them decide if genetic testing is right for them and explain how their test results might impact their physical and mental health. We discuss next steps and how to use this information to empower their health and their lives. We talk through their emotions and fears. Sometimes we just sit in silence. Every patient's journey is unique, and their feelings are complex.

  • Get to Know the ZBC Board: Arbella Parrot, PsyD

    Photo of Arbella Parrot ZBC Board Member

    Speaking to Arbella Parrot, you naturally latch on to her every word and get inspired by what she shares given her sincerity and enthusiasm. A licensed clinical psychologist for eighteen years, Arbella joined the ZBC board just over a year ago and has been an invaluable member of the organization ever since. We took some time to catch up with her as part of a Get to Know the ZBC Board series and are so honored to share her story with you.

  • Health & Wellness During & After Breast Cancer Webinar Series

    2022_free_webinar_series_health__wellness_after_breast_cancer_diagnosis.jpg

    Heart Health & Breast Cancer 

    Thursday, October 20, 2022

    Breast and other cancer treatments can cause heart and artery diseases, which need to be identified and treated. Some may even be prevented. Watch the recording to hear from two cardiologists who work with people diagnosed with breast cancer and a panel of experts to learn about who is affected, common signs and symptoms, and how they are working to prevent and manage cancer-related cardiovascular diseases. 

  • Heart Health Webinar Expanded Q & A

    Two cardiologists (heart doctors) who work with cancer patients, a researcher and a breast cancer patient navigator joined Zero Breast Cancer’s October 2022 webinar to offer important information about managing heart health during and after breast cancer treatment. One of the panelists is also a breast cancer survivor. They gave an overview of the current treatments most likely to cause heart problems and what can be done to prevent or limit them.

  • Pathways Breast Cancer Study Webinar Series

    pathways webinar series for website banner

    Thriving and Breast Cancer: What we've learned from the Pathways study - Register here

    Monday, February 6, 2023

    12:00-1:30 pm PT / 3-4:30 pm ET

    Please join Zero Breast Cancer and Kaiser Permanente Division of Research for an hour of experts presenting their findings about diet, nutrition and Vitamin D after a breast cancer diagnosis, followed by 30 minutes of discussion, including answering your questions.

    Larry Kushi, ScD (Kaiser Permanente Northern California Division of Research), Principal Investigator of the Pathways Study, will give an overview of the first 18-years of this ongoing research of breast cancer survivorship. Dr. Kushi will be joined by Isaac Ergas, PhD, to summarize what the study has shown about the best diet and nutrition for survivors, and Dr. Song Yao, PhD (Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center), will present his intriguing findings on Vitamin D levels and supplementation.

    Zero Breast Cancer's Catherine Thomsen, MPH, will host the Forum and lead the Q&A with the researchers and the Pathways Study participants and others who serve on the Pathways Community Advisory Board. This meeting is for anyone interested, including:
    • People diagnosed with breast cancer, including metastatic disease
    • Those who care for or know someone diagnosed with breast cancer
    • Healthcare providers and social workers serving people with cancer
    • Public health professionals and researchers

  • Reflections on the Dipsea Hike from an Oregonian

    ZBC Dipsea Display Table 

    For the past year I have been working as the Communications Coordinator for Zero Breast Cancer from Southern Oregon. From the start, the mission statement of focusing on breast cancer prevention stood out to me as a unique perspective, as so many breast cancer organizations overlook these root causes. While I have forged strong relationships with my colleagues and an understanding of the organization from a distance, by recently attending the 16th Annual Dipsea Hike I gained a deeper sense of the wonderful work that ZBC does and the people they serve.

  • Self-Care for Breast Cancer Survivors during Covid-19 PART 1: Being Active and Eating Well

    Black woman eating salad

    Anyone who has ever been diagnosed with cancer has had their lives changed and may have needed new ways to cope . The Covid-19 pandemic is also changing lives. Many of us dealt with wildfire smoke in the summer and the shorter winter days can be another challenge. Breast cancer survivors on the Pathways Study Community Advisory Board (CAB) decided that understanding our risk of Covid-19 and taking care of ourselves are important and timely topics for us to address.

  • Self-Care for Breast Cancer Survivors during Covid-19 PART 2: Connecting with Others and Ourselves

    Self care blog part 2

    This is the second of two parts about what we can do for our health and wellness during the Covid pandemic, from breast cancer survivors on the Pathways Study Community Advisory Board. Here they share how they cope: connecting with people; taking a break; breathing deeply, meditating or praying; asking for support; getting sleep; gratitude; and focusing on moving forward. Research has shown that all of these can help our mental and our physical health. (Check out the first part for ideas on moving our bodies and eating well.)

  • Teen Cooks Nourish Body and Soul!

     Ceres cards

    ZBC is truly inspired by the teen cooks of the Ceres Community Project who prepare delicious and nutritious meals for breast and other cancer patients and their families. They do so under the supervision of expert nutritionist and chefs. The teens sign up for a regular schedule of prep and cooking sessions for a few months to several years. All of these young people make a commitment and have an impact. Meals are delivered to the patients and their families weekly – infused with love and messages of support prepared by elementary school volunteers. The Ceres Community Project is being recognized as the 2016 Healing Partner Award at our upcoming Honor Our Healers event on May 10th. You can learn more here.

  • The Tipping Point

    This inspiring post is from our Executive Director's cousin, Jo Gordon, with our thanks.

    Jo Gordon Reflections

    Several months after my dad died – 13 whiplash years ago – I was driving home from the gym one evening when a Josh Groban song began playing on the radio, Where You Are. Sitting at a red light, the mournful music washed over me. One verse gripped my heart, and squeezed and squeezed: Fly me up to where you are, beyond the distant star I wish upon tonight, to see you smile, if only for awhile to know you’re there, a breath away’s not far to where you are.

    I started to cry in a way I hadn’t before – not on hearing the news of dad’s sudden death, not standing at his gravesite on a chilly Johannesburg morning as kaddish was recited, not at the prayer service that evening, not as I waded through his closet, setting aside small treasures and throwing out boxes of boxes and bags of bags; not even that impressive collection of emptiness that he had stored so fastidiously for so long had been my undoing. But this one line in this one song wrung me out.

  • Top 5 Empowering Podcasts for Breast Cancer Survivors in 2021 by Shweta Chooramani

    Black woman with a smartphone and coffee wearing headphones.

    You are not alone if the social distancing requirements and complying with the need of living in a social bubble has left you feeling anxious, socially isolated and feeling depressed. You are among millions of people who are bearing the brunt of Covid-19’s psychological effects. Our exposure to the continuous feed of stimulating news and notifications over wifi devices, television and social media has made many of us, myself included, worry about the future. As a result, it has made us vulnerable emotionally and mentally. Adjusting to the new normal of being isolated was not easy. I found the thought of following the mundane routine daily with little or no avenues of recreation or in-person interaction made me anxious.

  • Waiting: The Hardest Part

    Jo Gordon Reflections

    Waiting to see if your new pain, out of nowhere, will resolve itself. Waiting for the surgeon’s office to return your distress call. Waiting to hear when you can be squeezed into the jammed CT scan schedule. Waiting to eat because if they can fit you in today, you need to be fasting. Waiting in a room filled with other waiters, all stoically counting minutes until it’s their turn to be stuck, probed, imaged. The longest wait – waiting for results. Waiting for the medical team to decide what happens next. Listening to an internal clock, ticking in a terrible silence. Waiting.