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Risk Factors

  • 10 Ways to Avoid Plastic Chemicals in Your Food (Plastic Pollution Coalition)

    ten ways plastic food two

    Health risks from plastics come primarily from food storage, preparation, and purchasing. When heated, plastic containers and/or wrap can leach harmful chemicals into your food. These chemicals, bisphenols and phthalates, are known endocrine disruptors and are implicated in numerous health challenges like diabetes, cancer, and obesity. Plastic Pollution Coalition is currently a co-investigator on a pilot study, ReThink Plastic, funded by California’s Breast Cancer Research Fund (CBCRF). PPC is working with Child Health and Development Studies (CHDS) to test an intervention strategy that reduces plastic use through educating trainers about toxic chemicals in plastics.

  • A Healthier Manicure for Californians

    nail salon small

    Big news: More Californians should be able to find local, healthy nail salons thanks to AB 2125 which Governor Brown signed into law 9/27/16. It establishes a statewide program for Healthy Nail Salon Recognition (HNSR), setting standards to reduce exposure to toxic chemicals for workers and for customers.

    Some chemicals used in nail salons are linked to reproductive and developmental problems, asthma and cancer. Human hormones can be affected and people are especially vulnerable when their body’s hormones are most active, as during pregnancy and puberty. The mostly women workers who handle these products for many hours every day are at particular risk.

  • Breast Cancer in Marin (2012)

    marin county

    “Marin County has Highest Breast Cancer Incidence Rates in the World”

    In 1994, the Northern California Cancer Center (now known as the Cancer Prevention Institute of California) released a report entitled: Breast Cancer in the Greater Bay Area.

  • Breast Cancer Risk Reduction and ZBC’s Girls’ New Puberty Campaign

    Parents teach a young African American girl how to ride a bike.

    Our materials for Girls’ New Puberty are helping parents and caregivers of girls under 8 years old reduce the likelihood of early puberty. You may ask yourself, why does it matter to an organization whose goal is to prevent breast cancer whether girls start developing early?

  • Breast Cancer Survivors Need More Support After Active Treatment Ends! ZBC Learns More

    bike survivor

    The period after active treatment is a time of heightened anxiety for many breast cancer survivors as they graduate from medical routines and also become concerned about recurrence. Zero Breast Cancer has spent the last couple of years laying the groundwork for an integrated, evidence-based educational campaign focused on breast cancer recurrence prevention for survivors. In order to ensure our campaign meets the needs of post-treatment survivors—especially underserved survivors, including racial/ethnic minorities, gender/sexual minorities and people who have lower incomes—we have been working with patients, survivors, caregivers and the professionals that serve them to collect information and better understand diverse points-of-view. We would like to take a moment to update you on our current work in the area. 

  • Doctors to Notify of Risk of Cancer

    mammogramdensity

    Starting April 1st, doctors are required by a new state law to notify women with dense breast tissue that they could be at increased risk for breast cancer. Zero Breast Cancer's Executive Director Janice Barlow and other Marin experts weigh in on why they hope the law won't cause unnecessary stress for women.

    Find out more, visit: marinij.com

  • Earlier Onset of Puberty in Girls Linked to Obesity

    rachael cornejo by raphael kluzniokIn 2003, Zero Breast Cancer collaborated with scientists from Kaiser Division of Research and UCSF to establish a Bay Area Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program which was funded by the National Institute of Health Sciences and the National Cancer Institute.

  • Feeling Bad About Our Weight is Unhealthy!

    mirror girl distorted

    Trying to lose weight? Think about changing to a positive focus on more exercise and/or healthy eating habits, rather than a number on the scale. A fascinating new study shows that even if you are at a healthy weight, feeling bad about your weight seems to cause the same diseases as being overweight, like diabetes!

    Sadly, weight dissatisfaction and poor body image can start early in girls and actually discourage healthy behaviors.

  • Food for Thought

    USA food blog

    Do you know what a family of four in North Carolina eats in a week? Do you know how the proportions of items vary between fresh produce, dairy products, animal protein, processed and junk food between families in the United States and Kuwait? Have you ever thought about the different packaging our weekly groceries come in? Where would you suppose the weekly shopping bill is the highest? Where would you suppose it is the lowest? Do you think there are correlations between health and different eating habits/cost of food?

  • Get to Know the ZBC Board: JT Peterson

    JT image

     

    It is such a pleasure to speak to JT Peterson and get motivated to do good in the world! As a personal trainer, coach, and co-owner of Ripped Body Fitness, he exudes positive energy and a “you can do it” attitude. JT has been a wonderful member of the ZBC board for almost two years and we took some time to talk to him as part of our Get to Know the ZBC Board series. We are honored to share his insights with you!

  • Get to Know the ZBC Board: Judy Wetterer

    Judy Wetterer blog for web2

    In this month’s Get to Know the ZBC Board interview, Judy Wetterer shares her wisdom as a survivor and advocate for breast cancer risk reduction. She has been involved in ZBC from the very beginning of the organization when it was Marin Breast Cancer Watch, later served as a member of the ZBC Teen Initiative Task Force and is now in her third year as a member of the board.

  • IBCERCC Report Breast Cancer and the Environment: Prioritizing Prevention

    ibcercc reportOn Tuesday, February 12, 2013 the federally mandated Interagency Breast Cancer and Environmental Research Coordinating Committee (IBCERCC), released its report, Breast Cancer and the Environment: Prioritizing Prevention.

  • My Experience Participating in Breast Cancer Prevention Research

    lianna and BCOT team with caption for web

    Several months ago, our colleagues at Breast Cancer Over Time (BCOT) asked us to help recruit for their study on the Impact of Chemical Exposure on the Human Breast. Like ZBC, BCOT focuses on preventing breast cancer in the next generation. They address the issue by championing and coordinating research into the environmental causes of breast cancer, while ZBC focuses on engaging communities in translating research into actionable steps that can reduce the risk of breast cancer. This study investigates the risks of chemicals in personal care products (PCPs), a topic ZBC actively addresses.

    As complementary organizations, promoting BCOT’s study was an obvious decision. While sharing information about the study it, I also discovered that it was personally relevant to me. Read on to learn more about the study and my experience with it.

  • Never Too Late to Quit Smoking

    A new article published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology shows that breast cancer survivors who quit smoking after their diagnosis had a 33 percent lower risk of death as a result of breast cancer than those who continued to smoke.

  • Presentando La guía de las niñas y la nueva pubertad

    ZBC New Puberty Spanish Promo Graphic for web

    ¡Zero Breast Cancer acaba de terminar de producir La guía de las niñas y la nueva pubertad, una traducción en español de nuestra versión en inglés de Girls’ New Puberty Eguide! Esta guía expande los mensajes en nuestra infografía y en la serie de videos de YouTube. En la página web interactiva, encontrará consejos fáciles para apoyar una pubertad saludable junto con videos, pruebas y enlaces a recursos adicionales. 

  • Talking About Breast Cancer Risk: It's Complicated!

    Rose blog image

    My favorite way to mix work and pleasure (or work and health if you prefer) is to walk and talk. I can't exactly do that in a digital medium so I am inviting you to sign up for the Dipsea Hike for Zero Breast Cancer and to read more about putting breast cancer risk information into context so that we can talk about it in a realistic way.

  • Talking with … a Cancer Activist with Her Dial at Zero

    rose barlow hth 2015

    J.: Zero Breast Cancer was launched in Marin in 1995. What sets it apart?

    Rose Barlow: It’s a little different from other breast cancer organizations. From the get-go we focused on the environmental causes and risk factors. We’ve been more committed to the idea of prevention than screening and treatment.

  • The New Puberty

    new puberty book

    Girls are developing faster and entering puberty earlier than a generation ago. Contrary to popular wisdom, early puberty is not merely a reflection of physical changes-it's deeply psychological with effects that can put a girl at risk for behavioral problems as well as long term health challenges, such as obesity, depression, eating disorders, and even breast cancer.

  • Tips on How to Reduce Chemical Exposure in Plastic (EWG)

    plastics blog

    Our homes are filled with plastics, and most of us don't really know what they're made of -- or whether they're safe. The Environmental Working Group (EWG) has put together these tips to help you choose better plastics and plastic alternatives for your family:

    • Why you should pick plastics carefully.
    • How to choose and use safer plastics.
    • Finding safer, non-plastic alternatives.
  • Website Recommendation: BCERP.org

    BCERP Image composite correct size

    The Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program (BCERP) website aims to make the latest scientific findings on the relationship between environmental exposures and breast cancer both accessible and actionable. Consisting of a transdisciplinary consortium of scientists, the BCERP is funded by the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) National Institute of Environmental Sciences (NIEHS) and National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). With community partners, the BCERP researchers look at how environmental exposures during key life stages may increase risk of breast cancer. (Full disclosure: ZBC was a community partner in the past.)