facebook 32x32twitter 32x32instagram 32x32linkedin 32x32Visit ZBC on Pinterest

Research

  • Dr. Leah Kelley Is a Doctor, and More Important, a Healer

    healer leah kelley

    You could describe Dr. Leah Kelley by her credentials: Yale graduate; board certified in obstetrics and gynecology; medical director of the Breast Oncology Program at Marin General Hospital (MGH).

    Or, you could describe Dr. Leah Kelley by her personal attributes: Six-feet tall and athletic.

  • Earlier Onset of Puberty in Girls Linked to Obesity

    rachael cornejo by raphael kluzniokIn 2003, Zero Breast Cancer collaborated with scientists from Kaiser Division of Research and UCSF to establish a Bay Area Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program which was funded by the National Institute of Health Sciences and the National Cancer Institute.

  • Feeling Bad About Our Weight is Unhealthy!

    mirror girl distorted

    Trying to lose weight? Think about changing to a positive focus on more exercise and/or healthy eating habits, rather than a number on the scale. A fascinating new study shows that even if you are at a healthy weight, feeling bad about your weight seems to cause the same diseases as being overweight, like diabetes!

    Sadly, weight dissatisfaction and poor body image can start early in girls and actually discourage healthy behaviors.

  • From the Desk of Catherine Thomsen: Improving Health Education!

     

    equality equity empowerment for web

     

    I recently had the privilege of attending the Society of Public Health Education (SOPHE) conference.  So many researchers and community organizations are doing work relevant to ZBC! I want to summarize what I learned about two topics that are particularly timely: Health Inequity and Health Resources & Media Literacy.

  • GIS Conference

    ca map

    GIS for Community Impact: From Technology to Translation

  • Grant Propels New Study of Marin Breast Cancer Findings

    mark powell

    Scientists will continue research on groundbreaking discoveries by the pioneering Marin Women’s Study following a fundraising campaign that won a $77,000 Avon Foundation grant.

  • High Fiber as Teen = Lower Breast Cancer Risk!

    Fruits And Vegetables

    A new study suggests eating fruits, vegetables and whole grains in adolescence could reduce breast cancer risk later in life. This maybe especially true for pre-menopausal cancer, which affects more women of color and is often more aggressive.

    Not Too Late!

    Even in early adulthood, for every additional 10g of fiber eaten (~ 1 apple & 2 slices whole wheat bread) there was a 13% drop in risk.

  • Join the Wisdom Study: Help Improve Mammogram Screening Guidelines

    Wisdom Study

    Breast cancer screening advice can be confusing. A new study in California aims to find a better way forward and is actively recruiting participants. Please consider how you can help. Click on the image below to visit the study website.

  • Memory & Thinking Problems after Breast Cancer

    Asian woman on phone from KP Pathways newsletter for web

    This blog is abstracted from an article in the Winter 2019 Pathways newsletter.

    Have you heard the term Chemo Brain? Until the last decade, when women reported memory and thinking problems during or after being treated for breast cancer, they were often ignored. Now we know that cancer and cancer treatment can cause these changes and research is progressing on how to help people who have Chemo brain, also known as Cancer-related Cognitive Impairment (CRCI). We can take heart that most of us will recover our brain function and that there are things we can do to deal with memory/thinking problems.

  • My Experience Participating in Breast Cancer Prevention Research

    lianna and BCOT team with caption for web

    Several months ago, our colleagues at Breast Cancer Over Time (BCOT) asked us to help recruit for their study on the Impact of Chemical Exposure on the Human Breast. Like ZBC, BCOT focuses on preventing breast cancer in the next generation. They address the issue by championing and coordinating research into the environmental causes of breast cancer, while ZBC focuses on engaging communities in translating research into actionable steps that can reduce the risk of breast cancer. This study investigates the risks of chemicals in personal care products (PCPs), a topic ZBC actively addresses.

    As complementary organizations, promoting BCOT’s study was an obvious decision. While sharing information about the study it, I also discovered that it was personally relevant to me. Read on to learn more about the study and my experience with it.

  • Never Too Late to Quit Smoking

    A new article published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology shows that breast cancer survivors who quit smoking after their diagnosis had a 33 percent lower risk of death as a result of breast cancer than those who continued to smoke.

  • Place Matters by Salma Shariff-Marco, PhD, MPH, and Scarlett Lin Gomez, PhD, MPH

      Salma and Scarlett

     

    Research shows that our zip code can be just as important as our genetic code (DNA) in shaping our health. Where we live, work and learn affects our opportunities for physical activity, access to healthy and affordable foods, potential for social engagement and support, and exposure to stressful circumstances.

  • Problemas de memoria y pensamiento después del cáncer de seno

     Pathways memory newsletter image standing

    Este blog ha sido resumido de un artículo en el boletín de invierno 2019 del Estudio Pathways.

    ¿Has escuchado el término Chemo Brain o Quimiocerebro? Hasta la última década, cuando las mujeres informaban problemas de memoria y pensamiento durante o después de recibir tratamiento para el cáncer de mama, a menudo se las ignoraba. Ahora sabemos que el cáncer y el tratamiento del cáncer pueden causar estos cambios y se están realizando investigaciones sobre cómo ayudar a las personas que tienen quimiocerebro, también conocido como deterioro cognitivo relacionado con el cáncer (DCRC). Nos anima saber que la mayoría de nosotras recuperaremos nuestra función cerebral y que hay cosas que podemos hacer para lidiar con los problemas de memoria y pensamiento.

  • Research Inspired by Marin Women with Very Low Breast Cancer Risk Could Lead to New Prevention Strategies

    pregnant woman

    Research that began with the Marin Women’s Study has now been duplicated in the larger California Teachers Study, demonstrating that women who develop hypertension in pregnancy and carry a common gene variant have up to a 90% lower breast cancer risk.

    “This research could contribute to understanding the key impact of pregnancy on breast cancer risk, and may help explain why some women are protected while others are not,” said lead researcher Mark Powell, MD, MPH, visiting scientist at the Buck Institute and Director of the Breast Cancer Prevention Project.

  • Talking About Breast Cancer Risk: It's Complicated!

    Rose blog image

    My favorite way to mix work and pleasure (or work and health if you prefer) is to walk and talk. I can't exactly do that in a digital medium so I am inviting you to sign up for the Dipsea Hike for Zero Breast Cancer and to read more about putting breast cancer risk information into context so that we can talk about it in a realistic way.

  • The New Puberty

    new puberty book

    Girls are developing faster and entering puberty earlier than a generation ago. Contrary to popular wisdom, early puberty is not merely a reflection of physical changes-it's deeply psychological with effects that can put a girl at risk for behavioral problems as well as long term health challenges, such as obesity, depression, eating disorders, and even breast cancer.

  • Website Recommendation: BCERP.org

    BCERP Image composite correct size

    The Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program (BCERP) website aims to make the latest scientific findings on the relationship between environmental exposures and breast cancer both accessible and actionable. Consisting of a transdisciplinary consortium of scientists, the BCERP is funded by the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) National Institute of Environmental Sciences (NIEHS) and National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). With community partners, the BCERP researchers look at how environmental exposures during key life stages may increase risk of breast cancer. (Full disclosure: ZBC was a community partner in the past.)

  • Website Recommendation: BreastCancer.org

    breastcancer.org logo blog two

    When dealing with breast cancer, and looking to prevent breast cancer, the vast amount of information and the decisions that need to be made can be overwhelming. In 1999, Dr. Marisa Weiss, a renowned breast oncologist, founded breastcancer.org to address these needs. As a non-profit organization, breastcancer.org is dedicated to providing the most reliable, complete, and up-to-date information about breast cancer. It is an excellent resource.  Their mission is to help women and their loved ones make sense of the complex medical and personal information about breast health and breast cancer so that they can make the best decisions for their lives. The people behind breastcancer.org bring with them a diverse set of skills and experience, from medical experts, writers, editors, and business development experts, to designers and web producers. A Professional Advisory Board (PAB) reviews all the medical information on the website. The PAB includes over 70 practicing medical professionals from around the world who are leaders in their fields. Breastcancer.org also provides a Spanish translation of its pages on the website.

  • Website Recommendation: EWG.org

    ewg logo blog 

    The Environmental Working Group (EWG) is a non-profit organization whose mission is “to empower people to live healthier lives in a healthier environment. With breakthrough research and education, we drive consumer choice and civic action.” By providing integrated and detailed information on toxins in a variety of products, EWG encourages readers to advocate for themselves and their health by making educated purchasing decisions. Their staff covers a wide variety of disciplines, including a team of scientists, policy experts, lawyers, communication experts and programmers all focused on reducing our environmental exposures. In the past, they have found that their education efforts have enabled the public to put pressure on companies to remove potentially hazardous chemical ingredients as well as improving their overall practices. Overall, they diligently work to inform the public, provide specific tips to reduce exposure, and influence policy to create a healthier world for us all.

  • Website Recommendation: FacingOurRisk.org

    FORCE logo cropped

    If you are a survivor, previvor or caregiver affected by a hereditary cancer, have ever wondered whether you should pursue genetic testing, or have tested positive for a mutation and wondering what the next steps are, Facing Our Risk of Cancer Empowered (FORCE) has a website chock-full of information and resources. FORCE is a non-profit organization committed to promoting awareness, sharing current information, providing support, advocating for and supporting research, and building a community of research and medical experts to guide those who are dealing with hereditary breast, ovarian and related cancers. Whether you are new to the topic or well-informed, this website can provide useful information and support to guide your journey.