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Prevention

  • ZBC Internship Reflections by Leslie Civil

    Leslie at Marin Teen Girl conference for web

    As a Dominican University student pursuing a degree in Global Public Health (GPH), I wanted to engage in work outside my school environment. I am not from Marin County. I was born and raised in the San Mateo County, specifically in Redwood City. In my second year as an undergraduate, I was presented the opportunity to intern with Zero Breast Cancer. They were seeking a bilingual intern, and with only one day to spare I decided to apply and hoped for the best.

  • ZBC Teen Volunteer Janessa's Stress Management Tips

    Janessa Blog

    Reducing stress is a key component in helping manage daily tasks. It doesn’t matter if you are in high school, college, or an adult, it can always be a battle to deal with stress. Specifically, the stress that comes with a breast cancer diagnosis can be the biggest battle of them all.

    One of the best things to do is to take your mind off of whatever is bothering you. For example, when my mom was diagnosed with breast cancer five years ago, she would attend weekly yoga classes and would go to any seminars offered at the hospital in order to gather information and meet others going through the same battle as her. She felt that attending weekly events really helped her through her treatment and post-treatment stages.

  • ZBC Teen Volunteer Keisha's Exercise Tips

    keisha blog

    There are many different ways to reduce the risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer, one of which is living a healthy lifestyle. One factor of a healthy lifestyle includes having daily exercise. Anyone can reduce their risk at any age, but it is especially encouraged to have an early start to prevent breast cancer.

  • ZBC’s Risk Reduction Education at High Schools

    Lianna Hartmour stands next to a wheel that has questions about breast cancer on it. Four students participate in answering the question.

    Did you know that teens’ actions impact lifelong health and wellness? Puberty is a particularly important time for either increasing or decreasing lifetime breast cancer risk. Breast development can continue into the early 20s, making high school students’ actions particularly significant.

  • Zero Breast Cancer Comments on Angelina Jolie's Preventative Double Mastectomy

    angelina jolie time magazine

    Janice Barlow, executive director of the San Rafael nonprofit Zero Breast Cancer, said what Jolie did is not unusual for women who learn they carry the BRCA1 gene. "People who carry the gene have a significantly increased risk of both ovarian and breast cancer," Barlow said. "It's not uncommon for women given that information to have a double mastectomy and have their ovaries removed."