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Health

  • ten ways plastic food two

    Health risks from plastics come primarily from food storage, preparation, and purchasing. When heated, plastic containers and/or wrap can leach harmful chemicals into your food. These chemicals, bisphenols and phthalates, are known endocrine disruptors and are implicated in numerous health challenges like diabetes, cancer, and obesity. Plastic Pollution Coalition is currently a co-investigator on a pilot study, ReThink Plastic, funded by California’s Breast Cancer Research Fund (CBCRF). PPC is working with Child Health and Development Studies (CHDS) to test an intervention strategy that reduces plastic use through educating trainers about toxic chemicals in plastics.

  • nail salon small

    Big news: More Californians should be able to find local, healthy nail salons thanks to AB 2125 which Governor Brown signed into law 9/27/16. It establishes a statewide program for Healthy Nail Salon Recognition (HNSR), setting standards to reduce exposure to toxic chemicals for workers and for customers.

    Some chemicals used in nail salons are linked to reproductive and developmental problems, asthma and cancer. Human hormones can be affected and people are especially vulnerable when their body’s hormones are most active, as during pregnancy and puberty. The mostly women workers who handle these products for many hours every day are at particular risk.

  • kid drinking water

    Making water more available in New York City public schools through self-serve water dispensers in cafeterias resulted in small—but statistically significant—declines in students' weight, according to new findings.

  • cancer.net mobile image for web

    Our first app for review is geared to people starting or currently receiving cancer treatment. It would also be very helpful after treatment to track long-term symptoms and medical follow-up. Cancer.Net Mobile is available free for iPhone, iPad and Android. This app is available in Spanish, too! Just download on a Spanish-enabled device.

    It offers tools to help understand cancer and monitor health. Developed by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), it includes the latest medical information from a reliable source. In Google Play it has a 4.3 star (out of 5) rating. The latest update (version 4.0, June 2018) has made this app much more user-friendly, and it appears that they addressed technical problems that were previously reported.

  •  Detox Me Image for web

    Like many health conditions, the risk of breast cancer can be impacted by exposure to harmful chemicals. As scientists have learned more about these problems, new resources have been developed. Detox Me is a free smartphone app that provides “…a personalized guide to reduce your exposure to toxic chemicals.” It has simple, research-based tips on how to avoid chemicals that affect our hormones and choose safer products. For those of us seeking to reduce harmful chemicals from our daily lives, it will track our progress and offer rewards!

  •  Tam High Club Group

    The 2016 Francine Levien Activist Award will be presented to the Tampalpais High School Breast Cancer Awareness Club for their ongoing support of the mission of Zero Breast Cancer and for being role models in the way they engage their peers in efforts to ensure progress towards preventing this disease. The award will be accepted by club president Maddie Stoops, along with fellow leaders Ali Merkl, Colette Lowry and Hans Glader at this year’s Honor Our Healers event coming up on May 10th. You can read about it here.

  • Did you know that eating poorly and not exercising are not only bad for your health, but for your wallet as well? A study conducted by the University of Sydney found that "physical inactivity costs the global economy $67.5 billion a year in healthcare and productivity losses" (Voice of America, 2016). Some common risks that are elevated with lack of activity include heart disease, diabetes, and cancer and the overall lack of exercise is estimated to cause almost as many deaths as smoking this year. However, it is important to remember that many of these tragedies can be avoided by practicing prevention!

  • Ripped Body Team smaller

    This year, ZBC recognizes three up and coming leaders who are making a big investment in our community. JT and Jake Peterson and colleague Marcus Hall run Ripped Body Fitness in Mill Valley. These young men are the best of their generation: they work hard, play hard and focus on healthy living in every respect, including giving back to the community in many generous ways. We are excited to honor them and tell their story at our upcoming Honor Our Healers event on May 10th. You can learn more here.

  • healer leah kelley

    You could describe Dr. Leah Kelley by her credentials: Yale graduate; board certified in obstetrics and gynecology; medical director of the Breast Oncology Program at Marin General Hospital (MGH).

    Or, you could describe Dr. Leah Kelley by her personal attributes: Six-feet tall and athletic.

  • handwashing image smallMike Kemp/Blend Images/Getty Images

    What happens when the products we use to stay healthy are actually doing more harm than good? According to recent news, “the FDA says there's no evidence that antibacterial soaps do a better job cleaning hands, and chemicals in them may pose health hazards” (National Public Radio, 2016).

  • USA food blog

    Do you know what a family of four in North Carolina eats in a week? Do you know how the proportions of items vary between fresh produce, dairy products, animal protein, processed and junk food between families in the United States and Kuwait? Have you ever thought about the different packaging our weekly groceries come in? Where would you suppose the weekly shopping bill is the highest? Where would you suppose it is the lowest? Do you think there are correlations between health and different eating habits/cost of food?

  • Photo of Arbella Parrot ZBC Board Member

    Speaking to Arbella Parrot, you naturally latch on to her every word and get inspired by what she shares given her sincerity and enthusiasm. A licensed clinical psychologist for eighteen years, Arbella joined the ZBC board just over a year ago and has been an invaluable member of the organization ever since. We took some time to catch up with her as part of a Get to Know the ZBC Board series and are so honored to share her story with you.

  • JT image

     

    It is such a pleasure to speak to JT Peterson and get motivated to do good in the world! As a personal trainer, coach, and co-owner of Ripped Body Fitness, he exudes positive energy and a “you can do it” attitude. JT has been a wonderful member of the ZBC board for almost two years and we took some time to talk to him as part of our Get to Know the ZBC Board series. We are honored to share his insights with you!

  •  Kevin Image

    Kevin Gay shares his enthusiasm for Zero Breast Cancer in this month’s Get to Know the Board interview. In his second year as a board member, Kevin’s financial management expertise and knowledge of nonprofit governance have been invaluable to advancing the ZBC mission. 

  • Lexi picture for web

    Next up in the Get to Know the ZBC Board series is Lexi Mele-Algus. Lexi got to know Zero Breast Cancer as a pro-bono business consultant through the Taproot Foundation. Once that assignment was completed, Lexi jumped at the opportunity to join our board. In her year and a half as a board member, she has continued to draw upon her expertise in the field of healthcare systems to support and advance the strategic mission of ZBC.

  •  Tai Chi in Park Dreamstime for web2

    Physical activity is one of the most beneficial things you can do for your health. It reduces the risk of many diseases, including breast cancer. It can also lead to better outcomes for people who have breast cancer and reduce the risk of reoccurrence for those who have recovered from the disease.

    Did you know that you don’t have to drip sweat to see the benefits of exercise? For example, tai chi is a gentle exercise that shows similar benefits to more vigorous activities. It may improve the immune system, cardio-vascular fitness, strength, flexibility, balance, stress level and sleep.

  • ZBC New Puberty Spanish Promo Graphic for web

    Zero Breast Cancer has just finished producing La guía de las niñas y la nueva pubertad, a Spanish-language translation of our Girls’ New Puberty Eguide! This guide expands upon the messages in our Spanish infographic and YouTube video series. In this interactive webpage, you will find easy tips to support healthy puberty alongside videos, quizzes and links to more resources. 

  • A new article published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology shows that breast cancer survivors who quit smoking after their diagnosis had a 33 percent lower risk of death as a result of breast cancer than those who continued to smoke.

  • pregnant woman

    Research that began with the Marin Women’s Study has now been duplicated in the larger California Teachers Study, demonstrating that women who develop hypertension in pregnancy and carry a common gene variant have up to a 90% lower breast cancer risk.

    “This research could contribute to understanding the key impact of pregnancy on breast cancer risk, and may help explain why some women are protected while others are not,” said lead researcher Mark Powell, MD, MPH, visiting scientist at the Buck Institute and Director of the Breast Cancer Prevention Project.

  • Maritza and Ian recording for web
    Sound specialist Ian Walker of Hurricane Images
    and volunteer Maritza Cárdenas 
    record the narration for our
    Girls' New Puberty tips videos in Spanish.

    Zero Breast Cancer succeeds in very large part due to a dedicated cadre of volunteers, some of whom offer specialized and/or skilled pro-bono services. This month we thank and recognize 6 people who supported ZBC work in 2018 by translating, narrating, and/or reviewing new elements of our Girls’ New Puberty campaign: Chely Córdova, Frances Chiu, Hannah Barlow, Larry Chu, Maritza Cárdenas, and Perry Borders.