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  • Introducing zbclink.org

    zbclink for web

    You might have noticed that our web address, zerobreastcancer.org, is a bit long. When we add on the exact location of our materials, it's much longer! Some of our materials aren't even housed on our website but exist on YouTube and other platforms. In order to make our materials more easily accessible, we have begun using a branded shortlink: zbclink.org. If you go directly to that address, it will state that it is a "Branded Short Domain" without mentioning it belongs to Zero Breast Cancer. However, if you go to a link we have created with it, you will be brought directly to our materials. Here are a few links we have created so far:

  • Join the Wisdom Study: Help Improve Mammogram Screening Guidelines

    Wisdom Study

    Breast cancer screening advice can be confusing. A new study in California aims to find a better way forward and is actively recruiting participants. Please consider how you can help. Click on the image below to visit the study website.

  • Maggie Lives with Breast Cancer - A Family Tale of New Beginnings by Laura L. Vidal

    Maggie Cover from Amazon

  • Men Caregivers Need Support, Too

    rollercoaster by woody weingarten

    When it comes to breast cancer, men — especially prime caregivers — are often a forgotten part of the equation.

    A winner of a ZBC Honor Thy Healer: Healing Partner award, Woody Weingarten, has written a new book, "Rollercoaster: How a man can survive his partner's breast cancer," to remedy that situation. 

  • My Experience Participating in Breast Cancer Prevention Research

    lianna and BCOT team with caption for web

    Several months ago, our colleagues at Breast Cancer Over Time (BCOT) asked us to help recruit for their study on the Impact of Chemical Exposure on the Human Breast. Like ZBC, BCOT focuses on preventing breast cancer in the next generation. They address the issue by championing and coordinating research into the environmental causes of breast cancer, while ZBC focuses on engaging communities in translating research into actionable steps that can reduce the risk of breast cancer. This study investigates the risks of chemicals in personal care products (PCPs), a topic ZBC actively addresses.

    As complementary organizations, promoting BCOT’s study was an obvious decision. While sharing information about the study it, I also discovered that it was personally relevant to me. Read on to learn more about the study and my experience with it.

  • Never Too Late to Quit Smoking

    A new article published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology shows that breast cancer survivors who quit smoking after their diagnosis had a 33 percent lower risk of death as a result of breast cancer than those who continued to smoke.

  • Pacific Heights Cleaners Climbs Mt. Shasta for Zero Breast Cancer

    pacific heights cleaners logo

    The statistics are staggering, everyone knows of a person that has been touched by breast cancer and with all the advancements in medicine hopefully they survived. Karl Huie of Pacific Heights Cleaners climbed Mt. Shasta to create awareness for breast cancer as well as raise funds to support Zero Breast Cancer.

  • Pedaling for Prevention: Alex Leason Bikes 3,767 Miles for ZBC

    alex leasonAlex Leason was 16 years old when his mother, who lives in Mill Valley was diagnosed with breast cancer five years ago. "She went through chemo and is doing great now," reports her son. But the experience inspired Alex to do something to help the cause.

  • Place Matters by Salma Shariff-Marco, PhD, MPH, and Scarlett Lin Gomez, PhD, MPH

      Salma and Scarlett

     

    Research shows that our zip code can be just as important as our genetic code (DNA) in shaping our health. Where we live, work and learn affects our opportunities for physical activity, access to healthy and affordable foods, potential for social engagement and support, and exposure to stressful circumstances.

  • PLU Codes and GMOs: Red Flag or Red Herring (Organic Authority)

    plu organic fruit blog two

    Over the last few years, misleading information has persisted on the Internet. Can PLU codes – those four- or five-digit numbers on produce stickers – really indicate whether a food is genetically modified? Not really. There are other surefire ways to avoid GMOs, and a big effort is underway to put a real red flag on genetically modified produce and packaged foods.

  • Reflections on the Dipsea Hike from an Oregonian

    ZBC Dipsea Display Table 

    For the past year I have been working as the Communications Coordinator for Zero Breast Cancer from Southern Oregon. From the start, the mission statement of focusing on breast cancer prevention stood out to me as a unique perspective, as so many breast cancer organizations overlook these root causes. While I have forged strong relationships with my colleagues and an understanding of the organization from a distance, by recently attending the 16th Annual Dipsea Hike I gained a deeper sense of the wonderful work that ZBC does and the people they serve.

  • Research Inspired by Marin Women with Very Low Breast Cancer Risk Could Lead to New Prevention Strategies

    pregnant woman

    Research that began with the Marin Women’s Study has now been duplicated in the larger California Teachers Study, demonstrating that women who develop hypertension in pregnancy and carry a common gene variant have up to a 90% lower breast cancer risk.

    “This research could contribute to understanding the key impact of pregnancy on breast cancer risk, and may help explain why some women are protected while others are not,” said lead researcher Mark Powell, MD, MPH, visiting scientist at the Buck Institute and Director of the Breast Cancer Prevention Project.

  • Say Hello to Our Wonderful Advocate and Volunteer: Cristine Albert!

    Cristine Albert.

    Cristine Albert is one of ZBC's champions and works tirelessly on our behalf for the Dipsea Hike and more. Working with Cristine has been such a pleasure because she is so very enthusiastic and reliable, plus witty to boot! Learn more about her below.

  • Self-Care for Breast Cancer Survivors during Covid-19 PART 1: Being Active and Eating Well

    Black woman eating salad

    Anyone who has ever been diagnosed with cancer has had their lives changed and may have needed new ways to cope . The Covid-19 pandemic is also changing lives. Many of us dealt with wildfire smoke in the summer and the shorter winter days can be another challenge. Breast cancer survivors on the Pathways Study Community Advisory Board (CAB) decided that understanding our risk of Covid-19 and taking care of ourselves are important and timely topics for us to address.

  • Self-Care for Breast Cancer Survivors during Covid-19 PART 2: Connecting with Others and Ourselves

    Self care blog part 2

    This is the second of two parts about what we can do for our health and wellness during the Covid pandemic, from breast cancer survivors on the Pathways Study Community Advisory Board. Here they share how they cope: connecting with people; taking a break; breathing deeply, meditating or praying; asking for support; getting sleep; gratitude; and focusing on moving forward. Research has shown that all of these can help our mental and our physical health. (Check out the first part for ideas on moving our bodies and eating well.)

  • Spotlight on 2018 Girls' New Puberty Campaign Volunteers

    Maritza and Ian recording for web
    Sound specialist Ian Walker of Hurricane Images
    and volunteer Maritza Cárdenas 
    record the narration for our
    Girls' New Puberty tips videos in Spanish.

    Zero Breast Cancer succeeds in very large part due to a dedicated cadre of volunteers, some of whom offer specialized and/or skilled pro-bono services. This month we thank and recognize 6 people who supported ZBC work in 2018 by translating, narrating, and/or reviewing new elements of our Girls’ New Puberty campaign: Chely Córdova, Frances Chiu, Hannah Barlow, Larry Chu, Maritza Cárdenas, and Perry Borders. 

  • Spread the Love: Ideas for Safe and Healthy Valentine’s Day Gifts

    vday

    While truly every day is a good day to say “I love you” to the special people in your life, Valentine’s Day is a beautiful moment where we may go the extra mile with a special gesture. With over an estimated $18 billion spent annually for the holiday nationwide, it is a wonderful opportunity to vote with your dollars and support healthier options for farmers, workers, and our loved ones who are all a part of this global love story. 

    We are excited to share our suggestions for a healthy, safe, and sweet holiday!

  • Start 2018 with Health Promoting Habits: Seven Natural Ways to Control Your Appetite

    healthy food

    Welcome to 2018!

    Entering the new year is often a time for self reflection and new commitments to changing something about your life in order to be healthier, happier, and more at peace. For many women, a better relationship with food is something that they strive for anew on an annual basis and is challenging to resolve. 

    With an eye towards integrating rather than avoiding, we want to share some easy to use techniques to tackle hunger cravings that can help make this new year one where healthy new habits are formed. 

  • Talking About Breast Cancer Risk: It's Complicated!

    Rose blog image

    My favorite way to mix work and pleasure (or work and health if you prefer) is to walk and talk. I can't exactly do that in a digital medium so I am inviting you to sign up for the Dipsea Hike for Zero Breast Cancer and to read more about putting breast cancer risk information into context so that we can talk about it in a realistic way.

  • Talking with … a Cancer Activist with Her Dial at Zero

    rose barlow hth 2015

    J.: Zero Breast Cancer was launched in Marin in 1995. What sets it apart?

    Rose Barlow: It’s a little different from other breast cancer organizations. From the get-go we focused on the environmental causes and risk factors. We’ve been more committed to the idea of prevention than screening and treatment.