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Environmental Factors

  • ten ways plastic food two

    Health risks from plastics come primarily from food storage, preparation, and purchasing. When heated, plastic containers and/or wrap can leach harmful chemicals into your food. These chemicals, bisphenols and phthalates, are known endocrine disruptors and are implicated in numerous health challenges like diabetes, cancer, and obesity. Plastic Pollution Coalition is currently a co-investigator on a pilot study, ReThink Plastic, funded by California’s Breast Cancer Research Fund (CBCRF). PPC is working with Child Health and Development Studies (CHDS) to test an intervention strategy that reduces plastic use through educating trainers about toxic chemicals in plastics.

  • nail salon small

    Big news: More Californians should be able to find local, healthy nail salons thanks to AB 2125 which Governor Brown signed into law 9/27/16. It establishes a statewide program for Healthy Nail Salon Recognition (HNSR), setting standards to reduce exposure to toxic chemicals for workers and for customers.

    Some chemicals used in nail salons are linked to reproductive and developmental problems, asthma and cancer. Human hormones can be affected and people are especially vulnerable when their body’s hormones are most active, as during pregnancy and puberty. The mostly women workers who handle these products for many hours every day are at particular risk.

  • kid drinking water

    Making water more available in New York City public schools through self-serve water dispensers in cafeterias resulted in small—but statistically significant—declines in students' weight, according to new findings.

  •  Detox Me Image for web

    Like many health conditions, the risk of breast cancer can be impacted by exposure to harmful chemicals. As scientists have learned more about these problems, new resources have been developed. Detox Me is a free smartphone app that provides “…a personalized guide to reduce your exposure to toxic chemicals.” It has simple, research-based tips on how to avoid chemicals that affect our hormones and choose safer products. For those of us seeking to reduce harmful chemicals from our daily lives, it will track our progress and offer rewards!

  •  Tam High Club Group

    The 2016 Francine Levien Activist Award will be presented to the Tampalpais High School Breast Cancer Awareness Club for their ongoing support of the mission of Zero Breast Cancer and for being role models in the way they engage their peers in efforts to ensure progress towards preventing this disease. The award will be accepted by club president Maddie Stoops, along with fellow leaders Ali Merkl, Colette Lowry and Hans Glader at this year’s Honor Our Healers event coming up on May 10th. You can read about it here.

  • handwashing image smallMike Kemp/Blend Images/Getty Images

    What happens when the products we use to stay healthy are actually doing more harm than good? According to recent news, “the FDA says there's no evidence that antibacterial soaps do a better job cleaning hands, and chemicals in them may pose health hazards” (National Public Radio, 2016).

  • USA food blog

    Do you know what a family of four in North Carolina eats in a week? Do you know how the proportions of items vary between fresh produce, dairy products, animal protein, processed and junk food between families in the United States and Kuwait? Have you ever thought about the different packaging our weekly groceries come in? Where would you suppose the weekly shopping bill is the highest? Where would you suppose it is the lowest? Do you think there are correlations between health and different eating habits/cost of food?

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    equality equity empowerment for web

     

    I recently had the privilege of attending the Society of Public Health Education (SOPHE) conference.  So many researchers and community organizations are doing work relevant to ZBC! I want to summarize what I learned about two topics that are particularly timely: Health Inequity and Health Resources & Media Literacy.

  • Judy Wetterer blog for web2

    In this month’s Get to Know the ZBC Board interview, Judy Wetterer shares her wisdom as a survivor and advocate for breast cancer risk reduction. She has been involved in ZBC from the very beginning of the organization when it was Marin Breast Cancer Watch, later served as a member of the ZBC Teen Initiative Task Force and is now in her third year as a member of the board.

  • Helaine for web

    For the first interview of our new series, Get to Know ZBC Partners, we spoke with Helaine Alon, ZBC’s Communications Coordinator. Helaine started working with ZBC in October 2017. In her time with us, she has helped to overhaul the website, revitalize our social media pages, and write numerous book reviews and blog articles. We wish her well as she is moving on to new opportunities and are very grateful for the important work she has accomplished during her time with ZBC. 

  • ibcercc reportOn Tuesday, February 12, 2013 the federally mandated Interagency Breast Cancer and Environmental Research Coordinating Committee (IBCERCC), released its report, Breast Cancer and the Environment: Prioritizing Prevention.

  • A new article published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology shows that breast cancer survivors who quit smoking after their diagnosis had a 33 percent lower risk of death as a result of breast cancer than those who continued to smoke.

  • pacific heights cleaners logo

    The statistics are staggering, everyone knows of a person that has been touched by breast cancer and with all the advancements in medicine hopefully they survived. Karl Huie of Pacific Heights Cleaners climbed Mt. Shasta to create awareness for breast cancer as well as raise funds to support Zero Breast Cancer.

  •   Salma and Scarlett

     

    Research shows that our zip code can be just as important as our genetic code (DNA) in shaping our health. Where we live, work and learn affects our opportunities for physical activity, access to healthy and affordable foods, potential for social engagement and support, and exposure to stressful circumstances.

  • vday

    While truly every day is a good day to say “I love you” to the special people in your life, Valentine’s Day is a beautiful moment where we may go the extra mile with a special gesture. With over an estimated $18 billion spent annually for the holiday nationwide, it is a wonderful opportunity to vote with your dollars and support healthier options for farmers, workers, and our loved ones who are all a part of this global love story. 

    We are excited to share our suggestions for a healthy, safe, and sweet holiday!

  • Rose blog image

    My favorite way to mix work and pleasure (or work and health if you prefer) is to walk and talk. I can't exactly do that in a digital medium so I am inviting you to sign up for the Dipsea Hike for Zero Breast Cancer and to read more about putting breast cancer risk information into context so that we can talk about it in a realistic way.

  • plastics blog

    Our homes are filled with plastics, and most of us don't really know what they're made of -- or whether they're safe. The Environmental Working Group (EWG) has put together these tips to help you choose better plastics and plastic alternatives for your family:

    • Why you should pick plastics carefully.
    • How to choose and use safer plastics.
    • Finding safer, non-plastic alternatives.
  • BCERP Image composite correct size

    The Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program (BCERP) website aims to make the latest scientific findings on the relationship between environmental exposures and breast cancer both accessible and actionable. Consisting of a transdisciplinary consortium of scientists, the BCERP is funded by the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) National Institute of Environmental Sciences (NIEHS) and National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). With community partners, the BCERP researchers look at how environmental exposures during key life stages may increase risk of breast cancer. (Full disclosure: ZBC was a community partner in the past.)

  • breastcancer.org logo blog two

    When dealing with breast cancer, and looking to prevent breast cancer, the vast amount of information and the decisions that need to be made can be overwhelming. In 1999, Dr. Marisa Weiss, a renowned breast oncologist, founded breastcancer.org to address these needs. As a non-profit organization, breastcancer.org is dedicated to providing the most reliable, complete, and up-to-date information about breast cancer. It is an excellent resource.  Their mission is to help women and their loved ones make sense of the complex medical and personal information about breast health and breast cancer so that they can make the best decisions for their lives. The people behind breastcancer.org bring with them a diverse set of skills and experience, from medical experts, writers, editors, and business development experts, to designers and web producers. A Professional Advisory Board (PAB) reviews all the medical information on the website. The PAB includes over 70 practicing medical professionals from around the world who are leaders in their fields. Breastcancer.org also provides a Spanish translation of its pages on the website.

  • ewg logo blog 

    The Environmental Working Group (EWG) is a non-profit organization whose mission is “to empower people to live healthier lives in a healthier environment. With breakthrough research and education, we drive consumer choice and civic action.” By providing integrated and detailed information on toxins in a variety of products, EWG encourages readers to advocate for themselves and their health by making educated purchasing decisions. Their staff covers a wide variety of disciplines, including a team of scientists, policy experts, lawyers, communication experts and programmers all focused on reducing our environmental exposures. In the past, they have found that their education efforts have enabled the public to put pressure on companies to remove potentially hazardous chemical ingredients as well as improving their overall practices. Overall, they diligently work to inform the public, provide specific tips to reduce exposure, and influence policy to create a healthier world for us all.