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Breast Cancer

  • Get to Know the ZBC Board: Melissa Felder

    Melissa Image for web

    Board President Melissa Felder discusses the significance of Zero Breast Cancer in this month’s Get to Know the ZBC Board interview. She has been a member of the Board of Directors for the past three years and is toward the end of her first year of a two-year term as president. Building on her initial engagement with ZBC as a Taproot Foundation consultant, Melissa has helped ensure our organization fulfills our goals to prevent breast cancer in the next generation. She will help oversee exciting new developments that will be made possible by Marjorie Bonner’s generous bequest.

  • Get to Know ZBC Partners: Helaine Alon

    Helaine for web

    For the first interview of our new series, Get to Know ZBC Partners, we spoke with Helaine Alon, ZBC’s Communications Coordinator. Helaine started working with ZBC in October 2017. In her time with us, she has helped to overhaul the website, revitalize our social media pages, and write numerous book reviews and blog articles. We wish her well as she is moving on to new opportunities and are very grateful for the important work she has accomplished during her time with ZBC. 

  • GIS Conference

    ca map

    GIS for Community Impact: From Technology to Translation

  • Grant Propels New Study of Marin Breast Cancer Findings

    mark powell

    Scientists will continue research on groundbreaking discoveries by the pioneering Marin Women’s Study following a fundraising campaign that won a $77,000 Avon Foundation grant.

  • Health & Wellness After Breast Cancer Webinar Series

    2022_free_webinar_series_health__wellness_after_breast_cancer_diagnosis.jpg

    Peripheral Neuropathy: Dealing with Nerve Problems During & After Cancer Treatment

    Wednesday, April 27

    Cancer and its treatment can damage nerves, causing pain or discomfort known as peripheral neuropathy. In this webinar, learn from a researcher, a clinician and survivors about who is most likely to be affected, the latest treatments, and how cancer survivors can cope with nerve problems.

  • Health Benefits of Tai Chi and Qigong

     Tai Chi in Park Dreamstime for web2

    Physical activity is one of the most beneficial things you can do for your health. It reduces the risk of many diseases, including breast cancer. It can also lead to better outcomes for people who have breast cancer and reduce the risk of reoccurrence for those who have recovered from the disease.

    Did you know that you don’t have to drip sweat to see the benefits of exercise? For example, tai chi is a gentle exercise that shows similar benefits to more vigorous activities. It may improve the immune system, cardio-vascular fitness, strength, flexibility, balance, stress level and sleep.

  • Heart Health & Breast Cancer

    Woman with her head over her heart

    Women who have had breast cancer are living longer than ever before. By eight years after a breast cancer diagnosis, people without metastatic disease are more likely to die from heart disease than breast cancer. Breast cancer treatment can increase the risk of some diseases of the heart and artery, also known as cardiovascular diseases (CVD).

  • High Fiber as Teen = Lower Breast Cancer Risk!

    Fruits And Vegetables

    A new study suggests eating fruits, vegetables and whole grains in adolescence could reduce breast cancer risk later in life. This maybe especially true for pre-menopausal cancer, which affects more women of color and is often more aggressive.

    Not Too Late!

    Even in early adulthood, for every additional 10g of fiber eaten (~ 1 apple & 2 slices whole wheat bread) there was a 13% drop in risk.

  • IBCERCC Report Breast Cancer and the Environment: Prioritizing Prevention

    ibcercc reportOn Tuesday, February 12, 2013 the federally mandated Interagency Breast Cancer and Environmental Research Coordinating Committee (IBCERCC), released its report, Breast Cancer and the Environment: Prioritizing Prevention.

  • Join the Wisdom Study: Help Improve Mammogram Screening Guidelines

    Wisdom Study

    Breast cancer screening advice can be confusing. A new study in California aims to find a better way forward and is actively recruiting participants. Please consider how you can help. Click on the image below to visit the study website.

  • Memory & Thinking Problems after Breast Cancer

    memory and thinking probs

    This blog is abstracted from an article in the Winter 2019 Pathways newsletter.

    Have you heard the term Chemo Brain? Until the last decade, when women reported memory and thinking problems during or after being treated for breast cancer, they were often ignored. Now we know that cancer and cancer treatment can cause these changes and research is progressing on how to help people who have Chemo brain, also known as Cancer-related Cognitive Impairment (CRCI). We can take heart that most of us will recover our brain function and that there are things we can do to deal with memory/thinking problems.

  • Men Caregivers Need Support, Too

    rollercoaster by woody weingarten

    When it comes to breast cancer, men — especially prime caregivers — are often a forgotten part of the equation.

    A winner of a ZBC Honor Thy Healer: Healing Partner award, Woody Weingarten, has written a new book, "Rollercoaster: How a man can survive his partner's breast cancer," to remedy that situation. 

  • My Experience Participating in Breast Cancer Prevention Research

    lianna and BCOT team with caption for web

    Several months ago, our colleagues at Breast Cancer Over Time (BCOT) asked us to help recruit for their study on the Impact of Chemical Exposure on the Human Breast. Like ZBC, BCOT focuses on preventing breast cancer in the next generation. They address the issue by championing and coordinating research into the environmental causes of breast cancer, while ZBC focuses on engaging communities in translating research into actionable steps that can reduce the risk of breast cancer. This study investigates the risks of chemicals in personal care products (PCPs), a topic ZBC actively addresses.

    As complementary organizations, promoting BCOT’s study was an obvious decision. While sharing information about the study it, I also discovered that it was personally relevant to me. Read on to learn more about the study and my experience with it.

  • Never Too Late to Quit Smoking

    A new article published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology shows that breast cancer survivors who quit smoking after their diagnosis had a 33 percent lower risk of death as a result of breast cancer than those who continued to smoke.

  • North Bay’s Nonprofits Give So Much to So Many

    gift of giving

    “When Zero Breast Cancer (ZBC) was searching for a new executive director,” Rose Barlow recalls, “a recruiter sent me the posting with the words ‘This is perfect for you – and you would be perfect.’

  • Pacific Heights Cleaners Climbs Mt. Shasta for Zero Breast Cancer

    pacific heights cleaners logo

    The statistics are staggering, everyone knows of a person that has been touched by breast cancer and with all the advancements in medicine hopefully they survived. Karl Huie of Pacific Heights Cleaners climbed Mt. Shasta to create awareness for breast cancer as well as raise funds to support Zero Breast Cancer.

  • Place Matters by Salma Shariff-Marco, PhD, MPH, and Scarlett Lin Gomez, PhD, MPH

      Salma and Scarlett

     

    Research shows that our zip code can be just as important as our genetic code (DNA) in shaping our health. Where we live, work and learn affects our opportunities for physical activity, access to healthy and affordable foods, potential for social engagement and support, and exposure to stressful circumstances.

  • Reflections on the Dipsea Hike from an Oregonian

    ZBC Dipsea Display Table 

    For the past year I have been working as the Communications Coordinator for Zero Breast Cancer from Southern Oregon. From the start, the mission statement of focusing on breast cancer prevention stood out to me as a unique perspective, as so many breast cancer organizations overlook these root causes. While I have forged strong relationships with my colleagues and an understanding of the organization from a distance, by recently attending the 16th Annual Dipsea Hike I gained a deeper sense of the wonderful work that ZBC does and the people they serve.

  • Research Inspired by Marin Women with Very Low Breast Cancer Risk Could Lead to New Prevention Strategies

    pregnant woman

    Research that began with the Marin Women’s Study has now been duplicated in the larger California Teachers Study, demonstrating that women who develop hypertension in pregnancy and carry a common gene variant have up to a 90% lower breast cancer risk.

    “This research could contribute to understanding the key impact of pregnancy on breast cancer risk, and may help explain why some women are protected while others are not,” said lead researcher Mark Powell, MD, MPH, visiting scientist at the Buck Institute and Director of the Breast Cancer Prevention Project.

  • Self-Care for Breast Cancer Survivors during Covid-19 PART 1: Being Active and Eating Well

    Black woman eating salad

    Anyone who has ever been diagnosed with cancer has had their lives changed and may have needed new ways to cope . The Covid-19 pandemic is also changing lives. Many of us dealt with wildfire smoke in the summer and the shorter winter days can be another challenge. Breast cancer survivors on the Pathways Study Community Advisory Board (CAB) decided that understanding our risk of Covid-19 and taking care of ourselves are important and timely topics for us to address.