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Breast Cancer Risk

  • Tips on How to Reduce Chemical Exposure in Plastic (EWG)

    plastics blog

    Our homes are filled with plastics, and most of us don't really know what they're made of -- or whether they're safe. The Environmental Working Group (EWG) has put together these tips to help you choose better plastics and plastic alternatives for your family:

    • Why you should pick plastics carefully.
    • How to choose and use safer plastics.
    • Finding safer, non-plastic alternatives.
  • Website Recommendation: BCERP.org

    BCERP Image composite correct size

    The Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program (BCERP) website aims to make the latest scientific findings on the relationship between environmental exposures and breast cancer both accessible and actionable. Consisting of a transdisciplinary consortium of scientists, the BCERP is funded by the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) National Institute of Environmental Sciences (NIEHS) and National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). With community partners, the BCERP researchers look at how environmental exposures during key life stages may increase risk of breast cancer. (Full disclosure: ZBC was a community partner in the past.)

  • Website Recommendation: BreastCancer.org

    breastcancer.org logo blog two

    When dealing with breast cancer, and looking to prevent breast cancer, the vast amount of information and the decisions that need to be made can be overwhelming. In 1999, Dr. Marisa Weiss, a renowned breast oncologist, founded breastcancer.org to address these needs. As a non-profit organization, breastcancer.org is dedicated to providing the most reliable, complete, and up-to-date information about breast cancer. It is an excellent resource.  Their mission is to help women and their loved ones make sense of the complex medical and personal information about breast health and breast cancer so that they can make the best decisions for their lives. The people behind breastcancer.org bring with them a diverse set of skills and experience, from medical experts, writers, editors, and business development experts, to designers and web producers. A Professional Advisory Board (PAB) reviews all the medical information on the website. The PAB includes over 70 practicing medical professionals from around the world who are leaders in their fields. Breastcancer.org also provides a Spanish translation of its pages on the website.

  • Website Recommendation: EWG.org

    ewg logo blog 

    The Environmental Working Group (EWG) is a non-profit organization whose mission is “to empower people to live healthier lives in a healthier environment. With breakthrough research and education, we drive consumer choice and civic action.” By providing integrated and detailed information on toxins in a variety of products, EWG encourages readers to advocate for themselves and their health by making educated purchasing decisions. Their staff covers a wide variety of disciplines, including a team of scientists, policy experts, lawyers, communication experts and programmers all focused on reducing our environmental exposures. In the past, they have found that their education efforts have enabled the public to put pressure on companies to remove potentially hazardous chemical ingredients as well as improving their overall practices. Overall, they diligently work to inform the public, provide specific tips to reduce exposure, and influence policy to create a healthier world for us all.

  • Website Recommendation: FacingOurRisk.org

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    If you are a survivor, previvor or caregiver affected by a hereditary cancer, have ever wondered whether you should pursue genetic testing, or have tested positive for a mutation and wondering what the next steps are, Facing Our Risk of Cancer Empowered (FORCE) has a website chock-full of information and resources. FORCE is a non-profit organization committed to promoting awareness, sharing current information, providing support, advocating for and supporting research, and building a community of research and medical experts to guide those who are dealing with hereditary breast, ovarian and related cancers. Whether you are new to the topic or well-informed, this website can provide useful information and support to guide your journey.

  • Why We Focus on Girls’ Health Before and During Puberty

    ZBC New Puberty Campaign Graphic for web

    The number of girls starting puberty before age 8 is more than double what it was just a generation ago! And this is a problem: scientific research has shown that earlier development can lead to health issues, both in the short and long term, including increasing lifetime breast cancer risk. 

    Puberty is controlled by sex hormones, which are influenced by behaviors and some chemicals in our environment. Girls today have different lifestyles than previous generations. For example, they have fewer opportunities to be active and new distractions that can make it harder to get enough sleep. Kids are also exposed to more and different chemicals that affect hormones. Scientists think that these changes have led to puberty starting earlier than ever before. 

  • ZBC Featured on 360BayArea Podcast - Beyond the Pink

    catherine 360bayarea

    Zero Breast Cancer is excited to share that our Program Director, Catherine Thomsen, is a featured guest on the November 360BayArea podcast. Titled Beyond the Pink, the episode explores the breast cancer topic from unique angles that go beyond the pink ribbon in order to understand genuine and diverse personal experiences of women who are diagnosed or had loved ones who have had breast cancer.

  • ZBC Reaches Washington, DC!

    2019 oct event pic with caption for web

    This Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Zero Breast Cancer materials have made their way to Washington, DC via a request from Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. – Xi Omega Chapter.

    ZBC educational fliers were shared with over 100 attendees at their Pink Table Talk: Breast Cancer Risks and Realities panel with speakers Dr. Regina M. Hampton and Dr. Carolyn B. Hendricks. The event took place on October 7th and was livestreamed on Facebook. Check out the recording of this very informative talk here.

  • ZBC Teen Volunteer Janessa's Stress Management Tips

    Janessa Blog

    Reducing stress is a key component in helping manage daily tasks. It doesn’t matter if you are in high school, college, or an adult, it can always be a battle to deal with stress. Specifically, the stress that comes with a breast cancer diagnosis can be the biggest battle of them all.

    One of the best things to do is to take your mind off of whatever is bothering you. For example, when my mom was diagnosed with breast cancer five years ago, she would attend weekly yoga classes and would go to any seminars offered at the hospital in order to gather information and meet others going through the same battle as her. She felt that attending weekly events really helped her through her treatment and post-treatment stages.

  • ZBC’s Risk Reduction Education at High Schools

    Lianna Hartmour stands next to a wheel that has questions about breast cancer on it. Four students participate in answering the question.

    Did you know that teens’ actions impact lifelong health and wellness? Puberty is a particularly important time for either increasing or decreasing lifetime breast cancer risk. Breast development can continue into the early 20s, making high school students’ actions particularly significant.