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Breast Cancer Risk

  • Breast Cancer in Marin (2012)

    marin county

    “Marin County has Highest Breast Cancer Incidence Rates in the World”

    In 1994, the Northern California Cancer Center (now known as the Cancer Prevention Institute of California) released a report entitled: Breast Cancer in the Greater Bay Area.

  • Breast Cancer Risk Reduction and ZBC’s Girls’ New Puberty Campaign

    Parents teach a young African American girl how to ride a bike.

    Our materials for Girls’ New Puberty are helping parents and caregivers of girls under 8 years old reduce the likelihood of early puberty. You may ask yourself, why does it matter to an organization whose goal is to prevent breast cancer whether girls start developing early?

  • Cost of Inactivity

    Did you know that eating poorly and not exercising are not only bad for your health, but for your wallet as well? A study conducted by the University of Sydney found that "physical inactivity costs the global economy $67.5 billion a year in healthcare and productivity losses" (Voice of America, 2016). Some common risks that are elevated with lack of activity include heart disease, diabetes, and cancer and the overall lack of exercise is estimated to cause almost as many deaths as smoking this year. However, it is important to remember that many of these tragedies can be avoided by practicing prevention!

  • Doctors to Notify of Risk of Cancer

    mammogramdensity

    Starting April 1st, doctors are required by a new state law to notify women with dense breast tissue that they could be at increased risk for breast cancer. Zero Breast Cancer's Executive Director Janice Barlow and other Marin experts weigh in on why they hope the law won't cause unnecessary stress for women.

    Find out more, visit: marinij.com

  • Earlier Onset of Puberty in Girls Linked to Obesity

    rachael cornejo by raphael kluzniokIn 2003, Zero Breast Cancer collaborated with scientists from Kaiser Division of Research and UCSF to establish a Bay Area Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program which was funded by the National Institute of Health Sciences and the National Cancer Institute.

  • FDA Bans Chemicals Commonly Found in Antibacterial Soaps

    handwashing image smallMike Kemp/Blend Images/Getty Images

    What happens when the products we use to stay healthy are actually doing more harm than good? According to recent news, “the FDA says there's no evidence that antibacterial soaps do a better job cleaning hands, and chemicals in them may pose health hazards” (National Public Radio, 2016).

  • Folleto de actividades saludables para mayores de 5 años

     Spanish Activity Booklet pages colored with pens

    ¡Estamos ampliando nuestra lista de materiales previos a la pubertad! Además de la campaña La nueva pubertad de las niñas dirigida a padres/cuidadores, ahora tenemos un folleto de actividades para niñas y niños de 5 años en adelante. Descargue e imprima nuestro Folleto de actividades saludables: ¡Ser saludable se trata de sentirse lo mejor posible!

  • Food for Thought

    USA food blog

    Do you know what a family of four in North Carolina eats in a week? Do you know how the proportions of items vary between fresh produce, dairy products, animal protein, processed and junk food between families in the United States and Kuwait? Have you ever thought about the different packaging our weekly groceries come in? Where would you suppose the weekly shopping bill is the highest? Where would you suppose it is the lowest? Do you think there are correlations between health and different eating habits/cost of food?

  • Get to Know the ZBC Board: Judy Wetterer

    Judy Wetterer blog for web2

    In this month’s Get to Know the ZBC Board interview, Judy Wetterer shares her wisdom as a survivor and advocate for breast cancer risk reduction. She has been involved in ZBC from the very beginning of the organization when it was Marin Breast Cancer Watch, later served as a member of the ZBC Teen Initiative Task Force and is now in her third year as a member of the board.

  • Get to Know the ZBC Board: Lexi Mele-Algus

    Lexi picture for web

    Next up in the Get to Know the ZBC Board series is Lexi Mele-Algus. Lexi got to know Zero Breast Cancer as a pro-bono business consultant through the Taproot Foundation. Once that assignment was completed, Lexi jumped at the opportunity to join our board. In her year and a half as a board member, she has continued to draw upon her expertise in the field of healthcare systems to support and advance the strategic mission of ZBC.

  • High Fiber as Teen = Lower Breast Cancer Risk!

    Fruits And Vegetables

    A new study suggests eating fruits, vegetables and whole grains in adolescence could reduce breast cancer risk later in life. This maybe especially true for pre-menopausal cancer, which affects more women of color and is often more aggressive.

    Not Too Late!

    Even in early adulthood, for every additional 10g of fiber eaten (~ 1 apple & 2 slices whole wheat bread) there was a 13% drop in risk.

  • IBCERCC Report Breast Cancer and the Environment: Prioritizing Prevention

    ibcercc reportOn Tuesday, February 12, 2013 the federally mandated Interagency Breast Cancer and Environmental Research Coordinating Committee (IBCERCC), released its report, Breast Cancer and the Environment: Prioritizing Prevention.

  • My Experience Participating in Breast Cancer Prevention Research

    lianna and BCOT team with caption for web

    Several months ago, our colleagues at Breast Cancer Over Time (BCOT) asked us to help recruit for their study on the Impact of Chemical Exposure on the Human Breast. Like ZBC, BCOT focuses on preventing breast cancer in the next generation. They address the issue by championing and coordinating research into the environmental causes of breast cancer, while ZBC focuses on engaging communities in translating research into actionable steps that can reduce the risk of breast cancer. This study investigates the risks of chemicals in personal care products (PCPs), a topic ZBC actively addresses.

    As complementary organizations, promoting BCOT’s study was an obvious decision. While sharing information about the study it, I also discovered that it was personally relevant to me. Read on to learn more about the study and my experience with it.

  • Research Inspired by Marin Women with Very Low Breast Cancer Risk Could Lead to New Prevention Strategies

    pregnant woman

    Research that began with the Marin Women’s Study has now been duplicated in the larger California Teachers Study, demonstrating that women who develop hypertension in pregnancy and carry a common gene variant have up to a 90% lower breast cancer risk.

    “This research could contribute to understanding the key impact of pregnancy on breast cancer risk, and may help explain why some women are protected while others are not,” said lead researcher Mark Powell, MD, MPH, visiting scientist at the Buck Institute and Director of the Breast Cancer Prevention Project.

  • Spread the Love: Ideas for Safe and Healthy Valentine’s Day Gifts

    vday

    While truly every day is a good day to say “I love you” to the special people in your life, Valentine’s Day is a beautiful moment where we may go the extra mile with a special gesture. With over an estimated $18 billion spent annually for the holiday nationwide, it is a wonderful opportunity to vote with your dollars and support healthier options for farmers, workers, and our loved ones who are all a part of this global love story. 

    We are excited to share our suggestions for a healthy, safe, and sweet holiday!

  • Start 2018 with Health Promoting Habits: Seven Natural Ways to Control Your Appetite

    healthy food

    Welcome to 2018!

    Entering the new year is often a time for self reflection and new commitments to changing something about your life in order to be healthier, happier, and more at peace. For many women, a better relationship with food is something that they strive for anew on an annual basis and is challenging to resolve. 

    With an eye towards integrating rather than avoiding, we want to share some easy to use techniques to tackle hunger cravings that can help make this new year one where healthy new habits are formed. 

  • Talking About Breast Cancer Risk: It's Complicated!

    Rose blog image

    My favorite way to mix work and pleasure (or work and health if you prefer) is to walk and talk. I can't exactly do that in a digital medium so I am inviting you to sign up for the Dipsea Hike for Zero Breast Cancer and to read more about putting breast cancer risk information into context so that we can talk about it in a realistic way.

  • Talking with … a Cancer Activist with Her Dial at Zero

    rose barlow hth 2015

    J.: Zero Breast Cancer was launched in Marin in 1995. What sets it apart?

    Rose Barlow: It’s a little different from other breast cancer organizations. From the get-go we focused on the environmental causes and risk factors. We’ve been more committed to the idea of prevention than screening and treatment.

  • Tips on How to Reduce Chemical Exposure in Plastic (EWG)

    plastics blog

    Our homes are filled with plastics, and most of us don't really know what they're made of -- or whether they're safe. The Environmental Working Group (EWG) has put together these tips to help you choose better plastics and plastic alternatives for your family:

    • Why you should pick plastics carefully.
    • How to choose and use safer plastics.
    • Finding safer, non-plastic alternatives.
  • Website Recommendation: BCERP.org

    BCERP Image composite correct size

    The Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program (BCERP) website aims to make the latest scientific findings on the relationship between environmental exposures and breast cancer both accessible and actionable. Consisting of a transdisciplinary consortium of scientists, the BCERP is funded by the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) National Institute of Environmental Sciences (NIEHS) and National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). With community partners, the BCERP researchers look at how environmental exposures during key life stages may increase risk of breast cancer. (Full disclosure: ZBC was a community partner in the past.)